GCSE Geography (short course) OCR Teaching Resources Page 9

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Showing results 81 to 90 of the 288 resources listed in GCSE Geography (short course) OCR
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Tourism In The Deserts
£3.00
Tourism within deserts is an increasing economic activity with many positive and negative impacts on those tribes people who call these areas home. These worksheets have the students disgussing these impacts and go on to develop a logo and slogan for a company which advertises that it takes these impacts into consideration while promoting tourism activities within deserts.
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Microsoft Word
Sand Dunes
£2.00
Sand dunes are created by the wind usually along a beach or in a desert. When the wind blows sand into an area behind an obstacle, such as a rock, bush or skeleton, where it is sheltered, dunes begin to grow as grains of sand accumulate.
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Microsoft Word
San People - People Of The Desert
£5.00
Archaeologists believe that the San people have been living in the Kalahari Desert for 30,000 years. That would make the San people the most ancient race! Some archaeologists think the San have been living in Africa for 80,000 years! About a thousand years ago, when another African tribe moved south into the Kalahari Desert area, they were surprised to find the San people already living there.
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Antartica - Desert At The Bottom of The World
£3.00
Antarctica is called a desert due to its low precipitation, which is primarily snow. Annually, the coastal regions receive about 200mm, while in the mountains and East Antarctica plateau can get less than 50mm. Due to the low average annual temperatures of -50oC there is less evaporation than a hot desert so the snow has built up over the years. There are also strong winds of up to 200mph.
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Microsoft Word
Waves
£2.00
This worksheets looks at the formation of waves and the distinct differences between constructive and distructive waves.
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Microsoft Word
Transportation - Longshore Drift
£2.00
The sea sources it materials from various places: cliff erosion, constructive waves, carried down rivers to the mouth and transported by longshore drift. Some beaches have beautiful golden sands whereas others have less attractive shingle, but there is a reason why beaches look as they do. The reason is longshore drift.
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The Hydrological Cycle
£2.00
The water cycle is the never ending movement of water between the ocean, atmosphere and land. Some of the water may be stored in the ocean, on the land or in the atmosphere. This water will be transferred (moved) around the cycle.
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Spits
£2.00
Spits are extended stretches of beach material, such as sand and shingle which project out to sea, joined to the mainland at one end. A spit is formed due to the coastline changing direction – Longshore drift is the main source of material build up as it brings materials up from further down the coastline.
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Microsoft Word
Salt Marshes
£2.00
Salt marshes are complex, fragile and one of the most threatened environments on our planet. This is due to their close proximity to industrial, commercial and recreational uses of coastlines. Environmental changes also threaten them by way of climate change and rising sea levels.
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Microsoft Word
How Do Waves Shape Our Coastlines?
£2.00
The sea, action of waves and their processes are what shape our coastlines, with their power being the most significant force of coastal change. These worksheets look at the swell, the fetch and how tides are formed.
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